‘Why’ and ‘how’

One of the smartest, bravest, kindest things we can do is listen to ourselves when our ‘why’ is changing. It doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s time to throw out the ‘how’. It may just be a clue that we’re maturing, we’re growing, we’re learning new things.

What was, what is

The act of changing our minds encompasses growth, humility, wisdom and kindness towards ourselves. I am learning it’s a skill to revere and cherish, not feel embarrassed or ashamed of.

Slowing down with intention

I couldn't write very often in 2020. I had to confront the self-help myth I believed: we need to pursue productivity at all costs, and optimise ourselves at every turn. In doing do, I learned that writing less is better for me.

Love Letters: David Farrier

Without Twitter or Instagram, and a newsfeed blocker on Facebook, it can be hard to connect with what’s topical, so I was delighted to hear that David had started a Substack. David’s work lights up my inbox because he and I share a particular interest. In his greater quest to understand human motivations, David seriously scrutinises conspiracy theories.

Love Letters: Anne Lamott

Anne is as fiercely determined as Christopher in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. She’s as kind as The Queen in A Bug’s Life. She’s as funny as Mark Watney in The Martian, if not funnier. She’s as humble as Samwise in The Lord of the Rings.

Truth can change

How do you look at what you used to think, who you used to be, with kindness and curiosity rather than disdain and embarrassment?